Tag Archives: javascript

AJAX-ified result paging is not good

An annoying trend in Web design: using AJAX to load results when there is more than one page.

Apple does this for their search results. Netgear does this when searching their knowledge base. Microsoft does this for their Mactopia discussion forums. All three ostensibly good, clean designs fail to consider what the hell a visitor wants in the first place, which is to see the next damn page of results.

The first problem with using AJAX to load results is that the browser view does not change when the new results are loaded. Suppose you have read the first ten results, you scroll to the last result on the page and the first result scrolls up and out of view. Then you click the link for the next page of results. The fancy AJAX loader replaces the existing list of results with the next page’s list of results, but does not move the view, leaving you staring at the last result on the second page when what you want is to see the first result of the second page, so you have to scroll back to the top of the page.

The script to load the results should scroll the view so the first result of the subsequent page is visible – I have yet to see an example of this behaviour.

The second problem is the URL does not change between one page and the next, which means you cannot bookmark any page other than the first. URLs and hyperlinks are the very stuff of the Web, it is mad not to make use of them.

My guess is that the Web designer in each of these cases was so pleased by the effect of updating the visitor’s view of a page without changing the browser location that she figured it was an improvement over the established technique of passing query parameters in a URL.

It is not. Please go back to the old-fashioned use of a query parameter to indicate the offset into a list of results.

Glow Javascript library

Only just come across the Glow Javascript library that the BBC released under the Apache license a couple of months ago. It looks good, and has excellent API documentation as well as discussions of general usage for the majority of the tools.

In particular it has widgets for auto-complete text inputs, a simple class for validating form input and supports CSS-style selectors for referencing DOM objects.

Being that the BBC is mightily concerned with scheduled transmissions, Glow has an implementation of a timetable for displaying concurrent “tracks” of time data – I think this would complement the Simile timeline library in various situations.

Seeing as I can’t do Javascript without jQuery or getting depressed, Glow is very interesting.